Ying Ding
University of Texas at Austin
Dr. Ying Ding is Bill & Lewis Suit Professor at School of Information, University of Texas at Austin. Before that, she was a professor and director of graduate studies for data science program at School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University. She has led the effort to develop the online data science graduate program for Indiana University. She also worked as a senior researcher at Department of Computer Science, University of Innsburck (Austria) and Free University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands). She has been involved in various NIH, NSF and European-Union funded projects. She has published 240+ papers in journals, conferences, and workshops, and served as the program committee member for 200+ international conferences. She is the co-editor of book series called Semantic Web Synthesis by Morgan & Claypool publisher, the co-editor-in-chief for Data Intelligence published by MIT Press and Chinese Academy of Sciences, and serves as the editorial board member for several top journals in Information Science and Semantic Web. She is the co-founder of Data2Discovery company advancing cutting edge AI technologies in drug discovery and healthcare. Her current research interests include data-driven science of science, AI in healthcare, Semantic Web, knowledge graph, data science, scholarly communication, and the application of Web technologies.  

2020 Talk: Knowledge Graph for Drug Discovery

A critical barrier in current drug discovery is the inability to utilize public datasets in an integrated fashion to fully understand the actions of drugs and chemical compounds on biological systems. There is a need to intelligently integrate heterogeneous datasets pertaining to compounds, drugs, targets, genes, diseases, and drug side effects now available to enable effective network data mining algorithms to extract important biological relationships. In this talk, we demonstrate the semantic integration of 25 different databases and develop various mining and predication methods to identify hidden associations that could provide valuable directions for further exploration at the experimental level. (Conflict of Interest: I am the co-founder of Data2Discovery - https://www.d2discovery.com/)